What is meant by synecdoche?

What is meant by synecdoche?

Types of synecdoche

Definition: as the RAE explains quite precisely, synecdoche is “the designation of one thing with the name of another, in a manner similar to metonymy, applying to a whole the name of one of its parts, or vice versa”.

The possibilities with this resource are infinite, and it also tells us a lot about how we conceive the world: for example, “I have 100 head of cattle”, instead of referring to the whole animal, we use its head to count it. Like when we have to divide a cake and we say: “how many per head” or “how many per beard”. But it is not only used to count, it is also used to designate a wine: “un rioja, un jerez”, etc.

The species for the genus, the genus for the species: “give us our daily bread” (the term ‘bread’ replaces all kinds of food) “the animal was barking” (the term ‘animal’ replaces the dog).

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A relation is a link or a correspondence.In the case of the mathematical relation, it is the correspondence that exists between two sets: each element of the first set corresponds to at least one element of the second set.When each element of a set corresponds only to one or the other, we speak of a function.This means that mathematical functions are always, in turn, mathematical relations, but that relations are not always functions. In a mathematical relation (or mathematical function), the first set is called the domain, while the second set is called the codomain.The mathematical relations existing between them can be represented in the scheme called the Cartesian plane. Suppose that the domain is called M and the condominium, N.A mathematical relation of M in N will be a subset of the Cartesian product M x N.The relations, in other words, will be ordered pairs associating elements.If M={5, 7} and N={3, 6, 8}, the Cartesian product d

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What is synecdoche 5 examples

To understand synecdoche, you first need to understand the concepts of metaphor and metonymy. If you don’t have a good understanding of metaphor and metonymy, there are videos on both concepts available through Oregon State’s literary resource guide. Metaphor, metonymy, and synecdoche are types of figurative language that use one thing to help us understand another.

A metonymy, as you know, replaces something we want to describe with something else with which it is associated. A synecdoche is a type of metonymy, but the thing associated here is an integral part, a piece, of what is being described.

The English saying of putting “boots on the ground” is a synecdoche: by boots, we mean soldiers. But boots are part of soldiers (at least when they are dressed), so this expression is a synecdoche rather than simply a metonymy.

The poet Allen Ginsberg was a great lover of synecdoche. Two examples are found in his poem “A Supermarket in California,” and understanding these examples helps us interpret Ginsberg’s themes. In the poem, the narrator fantasizes about following nineteenth-century poet Walt Whitman through a mid-twentieth-century supermarket.

Synecdoche examples in poems

I confess that I had never detailed in the name of the figures as such as the incorrigible Vamp, but I see differences between the ones you bring up, although Xiroi did not put the source, and the definitions of WR and the DRAE.

The DRAE definition is available to anyone who wishes to consult it, I don’t think it is necessary to copy it here. My doubt arises, although I have not explained it, after reading these definitions and looking for more information in didactic material available on the net, part of which I have copied here. For practical reasons I have preferred to pose my question directly without having to give too much background on where I have searched, looked and compared, which I have done, of course.

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The DRAE definition is available to anyone who wishes to consult it, I do not think it is necessary to copy it here. My doubt arises, although I have not explained it, after reading these definitions and looking for more information in didactic material available on the net, part of which I have copied here. For practical reasons I have preferred to pose my question directly without having to give excessive background on where I have searched, looked and compared, which I have, of course.